May 23, 2022  
ARCHIVED 2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
ARCHIVED 2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


The courses listed herein  have been approved by the faculty as authorized by the Board of Trustees.  Prerequisites (if any) and the General Education Requirement(s) which each course fulfills (if any) are noted following each course description.

Current course offerings are available in Merlin.

 

Cardinal Directions

  
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    CARD 160 - Seminar: May Study Away

    1.00-4.00 credit hours
    Provides students with an opportunity to pursue a field of study inside and outside the United States at an introductory level during May Term. Each course requires pre-departure sessions. Destinations and content change according to instructor. Course is repeatable with different content.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CARD 161 - May Study Away

    1.00 credit hours
    The May term travel component for a 100-level, spring semester, May term study away course. Course is repeatable with different content/destination.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CARD 190 - Cardinal Conversations

    1.00 credit hours
    Topics-based course that provides unique opportunities for students and faculty to engagein informal conversations around a shared experience or activity. Academic concepts take on new meaning explored in non-academic or unconventional settings. No disciplinary expertise required for students to participate in these introductory-level courses. Repeatable with varying topics. A maximum of four credit hours may be applied towards the 128 credit hours required for graduation. The course is graded Pass/No Pass.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CARD 200 - Transfer Seminar

    4.00 credit hours
    This course focuses on "sense of place" and combines writing, speaking and community engaged learning projects. Students learn about the academic, social and individual resources available to them as they transition to North Central College, and reflect on how they can make the most of their time here as they continue to develop their own unique academic, career and personal goals.

    Prerequisite(s): Transfer student with 12 or more credit hours.
    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Community Engaged Learning.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CARD 260 - Seminar: May Study Away

    1.00-4.00 credit hours
    Provides students with an opportunity to pursue a field of study inside and outside the United States at a 200-level during May Term. Each course requires pre-departure sessions. Destinations and content change according to instructor. Course is repeatable with different content.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CARD 261 - May Study Away

    1.00 credit hours
    The May term travel component for a 200-level, spring semester, May term study away course. Course is repeatable with different content/destination.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CARD 277 - Seminar: Study Abroad

    2.00 credit hours
    A workshop in intercultural learning designed for students enrolled in North Central College study abroad programs. Students explore the concept of culture, compare cultural values, investigate social relations and communication styles, prepare for adjustment and begin to develop intercultural competence. Required of all students who plan to study abroad.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Global Understanding.
    iCon(s): Experiencing Place, Thinking Globally.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CARD 360 - Seminar: May Study Away

    1.00-4.00 credit hours
    Provides students with an opportunity to pursue a field of study inside and outside the United States at a 300-level during May Term. Each course requires pre-departure sessions. Destinations and content change according to instructor. Course is repeatable with different content.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CARD 361 - May Study Away

    1.00 credit hours
    The May term travel component for a 300-level, spring semester, May term study away course. Course is repeatable with different content/destination.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CARD 400 - Cardinal Directions Senior Seminar: Liberal Arts and the Problems of Today

    2.00 credit hours
    Students practice interdisciplinary collaboration to examine a complex and persistent issue or problem and develop a constructive response to it. They evaluate the impact of a liberal arts education on themselves professionally and personally. Students reflect on how their general education experience complements their chosen disciplinary education and has shaped the ways in which they approach difficult questions.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.



Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 100 - Chemistry Today

    4.00 credit hours
    A chemistry course for non-science majors. A quest for understanding those facets of chemistry that most directly affect daily existence through a study of selected topics in inorganic, organic and biological chemistry. Does not count toward a chemistry major. May not be taken after any higher-level chemistry course. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s): High school algebra.
    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Sciences.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 121 - General Chemistry I

    4.00 credit hours
    A discussion of chemical principles through examples from the chemistry of carbon compounds and the molecules found in living systems. Major topics include atomic and electronic structure, ions, molecules, Lewis structures, VSEPR, hybridization, intermolecular forces, chromatography, equilibria, kinetics, stereochemistry and polymer chemistry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s): One year of high school chemistry and two years of high school algebra.
    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Sciences.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II

    4.00 credit hours
    An introduction to chemical principles within the context of the environmental issues of fuel and energy, water treatment and acid rain. Major chemical topics include gas laws, aqueous reactions and solubility, equilibria, acid/base chemistry, buffers, thermochemistry, redox, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 121 .
    iCon(s): Sustaining Our World.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 125 - General Chemistry for Engineers

    2.00 credit hours
    An introduction to chemical principles within the context of engineering. Major chemical topics include gases, periodic table trends, bonding, atomic and molecular structures, energy, entropy, kinetics, acid-base and equilibria and electrochemistry.

    Prerequisite(s): One year of high school chemistry and two years of high school algebra.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 251 - Organic Chemistry I

    4.00 credit hours
    Survey of the various classes of carbon compounds, with emphasis upon molecular structure, stereochemistry and mechanisms of Organic reactions. Techniques for isolating, purifying and characterizing organic compounds are learned in the laboratory. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s): Six hours in Chemistry including CHEM 121  or CHEM 122 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 252 - Organic Chemistry II

    4.00 credit hours
    Continuation of CHEM 251 . This course builds on previously learned concepts to further explore the mechanisms of organic reactions. The emphasis shifts from physical organic to synthetic organic chemistry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 251 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 295 - Research

    1.00-4.00 credit hours
    Individual laboratory investigation of a problem in chemistry, undertaken with guidance of a faculty member. May be taken more than once for up to four total credit hours.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
  
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    CHEM 301 - Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry

    4.00 credit hours
    Theoretical concepts of bonding including the solid state, acid/base and redox chemistry and kinetics. Descriptive chemistry of the elements. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 122 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 310 - Chemical Analysis

    4.00 credit hours
    Discussion of analytical methods including sample collection and preparation, statistical analysis of data and quantitative analysis including theory and techniques for gravimetric, volumetric, spectrophotometric, chromatographic and electrochemical methods. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 122 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 311 - Separation Methods

    2.00 credit hours
    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to separation methods including HPLC, GC, ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis and related sampling handling and data analysis. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 310 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 312 - Spectrometry and Spectroscopy

    2.00 credit hours
    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to atomic and molecular spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 310 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 313 - Materials and Surface Analysis

    2.00 credit hours
    Theory and practice of instrumental analytical chemistry related to materials and surface characterization. Major topics include electrochemical analysis, microscopy techniques, and solid-state analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 310 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 315 - Spectral Interpretation

    2.00 credit hours
    This course explores the spectroscopic methods and the identification of organic structures by interpretation of the spectra. Specific topics include 1D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H & 13C), 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (COSY, TOCSY, HSQC, NOESY, etc.), Infrared and Mass-Spectroscopy. This course emphasizes individual and collaborative problem-solving techniques that can be utilized to identify organic structures by the combination of the techniques described above.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 251 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 340 - Thermodynamics and Kinetics

    4.00 credit hours
    Chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics, including properties of gases, the First and Second Laws of thermodynamics and their application to physical and chemical systems, phase and chemical equilibria, rates and mechanisms of reactions, reaction dynamics. Laboratory required. Students with credit in PHYS 340  and PHYS 341  may not take CHEM 340 for credit.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 151 ; PHYS 132  or PHYS 162 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 345 - Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy

    4.00 credit hours
    Quantum theory, electronic structure of atoms and molecules, chemical bonding, computational chemistry, spectroscopic methods used to study molecular structure and reactions, statistical thermodynamics. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 151 ; PHYS 132  or PHYS 162 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 391 - Seminar I

    1.00 credit hours
    In this course, students cover relevant professional development topics such as ethics, job seeking skills and safety. Students, faculty and guest presenters discuss research results in the format of a scientific meeting.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 251  or concurrent enrollment.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 392 - Seminar II

    1.00 credit hours
    In this course, students learn to search the chemical literature, read primary literature and orally present a journal article. Students, faculty and guest presenters discuss research results in the format of a scientific meeting.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 251 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 399 - Independent Study

    1.00-12.00 credit hours
    Individual studies in chemistry, undertaken with guidance of a faculty member.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 401 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

    4.00 credit hours
    Coordination chemistry of the transition metals including isomerism, symmetry, group theory, molecular orbital theory, crystal field theory, UV-visible spectroscopy and kinetics and mechanisms of ligand substitution reactions. Study of macromolecular, supramolecular and nanoscale chemistry.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 301 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 451 - Advanced Organic Chemistry

    4.00 credit hours
    This course explores advanced topics in organic chemistry which build on the principles covered in CHEM 251  and CHEM 252  . The course explores one topic in depth such as physical organic chemistry, synthesis or catalysis.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 252 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 455 - Organometallic Chemistry

    4.00 credit hours
    This course explores the structure and bonding in organometallic compounds, ligands, fundamental organometallic reactions and catalysis within the context of the chemical and pharmaceutical industry.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 252 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 485 - Senior Research Capstone

    4.00 credit hours
    Students integrate their undergraduate chemistry education with independent research projects. Laboratory required.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing.
    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Writing Intensive.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
  
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    CHEM 493 - Seminar III

    1.00 credit hours
    Students, faculty and guest presenters discuss research results in the format of a scientific meeting. Students orally present the results from a completed research project (summer research, independent study, off-campus research program, CHEM 485 , BCHM 465 , etc.).

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 391  and CHEM 392 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHEM 495 - Research

    1.00-4.00 credit hours
    Individual laboratory investigation of a problem in chemistry, undertaken with guidance of a faculty member. Credit for research from CHEM 295 and CHEM 495 may be repeated up to a maximum of eight total credits.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
  
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    CHEM 499 - Independent Study

    1.00-12.00 credit hours
    Individual studies in chemistry, undertaken with guidance of a faculty member.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.



Chicago Area Studies

  
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    CHAS 310 - Leadership and Place

    4.00 credit hours
    (Same as: LEAD 310 .) Leadership and Place traces the influence of home towns and home places on contemporary and historical leadership paradigms while considering such ethical questions as: What role does place play in forming a responsible and responsive leader? How does one lead responsibly and well far from home? How and where do rural, urban and suburban ethical standards and value judgments converge and diverge? Where have the leaders of the past come from and where are they likely to be found in the future? Paying close attention to small communities and neighborhoods as key loci in the production of twentieth-century civic leaders and as ethical centers in a Jeffersonian republic, course texts, lectures and discussions feature real-life case studies designed to engage students in debates weighing ethical and moral positions viewed through the lens of place. Leadership and Place uniquely encourages students in the study of personal (inside-out) as well as cultural (outside-in) place-based, ethical perspectives while inviting them to consider the foundational role home communities play in ethical leadership on the local, regional and national level.

    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
    iCon(s): Experiencing Place.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHAS 390 - Special Topics in Chicago Area Studies

    4.00 credit hours
    Emerging issues, specialized topics, experimental offerings find their home in this course. That is, the regular curriculum may benefit from the expertise of a new faculty member, a more in-depth discussion of a particular issue or specialized content not represented in the main curriculum. This course provides the flexibility for these discussions and would include topics such as public housing, immigration, urban innovation, sports and urban life.

    Prerequisite(s): SOCI 223 , HIST 120  or ARTH 200 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHAS 397 - Internship

    0.00-12.00 credit hours
    An opportunity to develop substantive knowledge and professional skills as these relate to issues of urban, suburban or rural environments.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHAS 399 - Independent Study

    1.00-12.00 credit hours
    An opportunity to engage in a focused, independent study on a topic related to urban, suburban or rural settings.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHAS 400 - Chicago Area Studies

    4.00 credit hours
    The capstone brings together interdisciplinary themes in the study of urban, suburban and/or rural places, especially as these relate to the larger, Chicago metropolitan area. Students engage in a thoughtful, real world and practical examination of issues related to these places with particular attention devoted to their impact on life chances, opportunities and social justice.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): U.S. Power Structures.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.



Chinese

  
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    CHNS 101 - Elementary Chinese I: Getting to Know Chinese People in Your Neighborhood

    4.00 credit hours
    Introduction to modern Mandarin Chinese, starting with the sound system and then moving on to basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing and an introduction to Chinese culture. Taught in Chinese.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Community Engaged Learning.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHNS 102 - Elementary Chinese II: Going to the Great Wall of China

    4.00 credit hours
    Continued development of elementary Chinese skills, with speaking, reading, listening and writing proficiencies developed in a communicative context. Continued focus on authentic Chinese culture. Taught in Chinese.

    Prerequisite(s): CHNS 101 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHNS 105 - China Today

    4.00 credit hours
    An introduction to the profound socioeconomic transformation that China is currently undergoing and how these changes are impacting the Chinese people. It also explores China's role in international affairs, global economy and politics. In addition, a variety of topics regarding contemporary China such as technology, pop culture, social media and education are covered. Taught in English.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Humanities, Ethical Dimensions, Community Engaged Learning.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHNS 201 - Intermediate Chinese I: Studying Abroad in China

    4.00 credit hours
    Introduces the theme of "Working in China" to support the development of verbal communication skills, including the introduction of proverbs and idioms. Writing skills are emphasized and students are exposed to important cultural aspects of the Chinese language. Taught in Chinese.

    Prerequisite(s): CHNS 102 .
    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Humanities, Community Engaged Learning.
    iCon(s): Experiencing Place.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHNS 202 - Intermediate Chinese II: Working With China

    4.00 credit hours
    Develops the theme of "Working with China" to support the development of verbal and written communication skills, with an increasing exploration of Chinese culture. Taught in Chinese.

    Prerequisite(s): CHNS 201 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHNS 205 - Understanding China

    4.00 credit hours
    An Introduction to key concepts and frameworks integral to the analysis of Chinese culture and society. It highlights not only macro-level processes of social change and continuity but also the everyday experiences of individuals involved in these processes. Taught in English.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Sciences, Ethical Dimensions, Community Engaged Learning.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHNS 293 - Chinese Enrichment

    1.00-2.00 credit hours
    Individual projects related to other courses that support the development of proficiencies in Chinese. Taught in Chinese.

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor consent.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHNS 295 - Chinese Practicum

    1.00-4.00 credit hours
    Students assist faculty with pedagogical or other projects in Chinese. Activities vary according to the project needs and student background, but may include such work as the preparation of materials for language learning or assisting faculty through bibliographic research.

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor consent.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
  
  
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    CHNS 310 - Exploring China Through Film

    4.00 credit hours
    Examines the rich tradition of Chinese cinematography to explore major cultural themes, such as the family structure, parent-child relationships, the evolving role of women, gender issues and other profound developments taking place in contemporary Chinese cultures. Taught in Chinese. Repeatable with different content.

    Prerequisite(s): CHNS 202 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHNS 311 - Exploring China Through Popular Culture

    4.00 credit hours
    A survey of the significant cultural production in recent Chinese film, music, popular literature and other forms of mass media. Taught in Chinese. Repeatable with different content.

    Prerequisite(s): CHNS 202 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHNS 364 - Contemporary Chinese Identities I

    2.00 credit hours
    Examination of historical, ethnic and geographic factors that have contributed to the creation of Chinese identities, and their implications for today. Taught in English. Supports May Term travel/study course in China.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHNS 393 - Chinese Enrichment

    1.00-2.00 credit hours
    Individual projects related to other courses that support the development of proficiencies in Chinese.

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor consent.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
  
  
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    CHNS 410 - Communication and Composition

    4.00 credit hours
    Focuses on the continued development and expansion of vocabulary, oral proficiency and writing skills. Students read, discuss and summarize texts. Taught in Chinese.

    Prerequisite(s): One 300-level course in Chinese.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHNS 411 - Chinese for Professional Settings

    4.00 credit hours
    Development of linguistic and cultural skills related to the professional use of Chinese, focusing on the forms of interaction required for successful business communication. Taught in Chinese.

    Prerequisite(s): One 300-level course in Chinese.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CHNS 480 - Capstone Portfolio

    1.00 credit hours
    Preparation of a collection of documents including revised work from prior courses, and reflections on the student's growth as a Chinese major and intercultural questions. Additional assignments may be included but the portfolio must represent all five skills and include evidence of the student's extracurricular participation in the Chinese program. Required for the Chinese major. Taught in Chinese.

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor consent.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
  

Classical Studies

  
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    CLSS 190 - Words and Ideas From Greece and Rome

    4.00 credit hours
    Introduction to classical culture through study of Greek and Roman roots in English. Students expand English vocabulary and gain knowledge necessary to make educated guesses at unfamiliar words' meanings based on roots and basic linguistic concepts involved in word building. Special attention is given to spheres of classical culture, such as mythology, philosophy, ancient science medicine, which have been especially important for creation of English words. Fulfills the language requirement for transfer students with a minimum of 51 transferred credit hours at entry.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s): Being Human.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CLSS 200 - Introduction to Greece and Rome: Ancient and Contemporary Debates

    4.00 credit hours
    An innovative introduction to critical issues in Ancient Greece and Rome. Students take on roles, informed by classic texts, in elaborate games set in the past; they learn skills—speaking, writing, critical thinking, problem solving, leadership and teamwork—in order to prevail in difficult and complicated situations.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Humanities, Ethical Dimensions.
    iCon(s): Engaging Civic Life.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CLSS 250 - Classical Mythology

    4.00 credit hours
    A study of classical mythology based on ancient Greek and Roman sources, such as the epic poems of Homer. Course also considers theoretical definitions of myth; cross-cultural comparisons of mythological traditions, and post-classical reception of myths in art, literature and popular culture.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Arts.
    iCon(s): Being Human.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CLSS 255 - Greek and Roman History and Historians

    4.00 credit hours
    (Same as: HIST 255 .) Survey of major developments in Greek and Roman history from roughly 800 BCE–400 CE. In addition to understanding how societies in ancient Greece and Rome built, defended and lost their empires, the course also studies the social, cultural and environmental experiences of these complex civilizations. Students read modern historical interpretations as well as translated ancient historical sources of the period.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Humanities, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s): Thinking Globally.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
  
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    CLSS 320 - Topics in Classical Art

    4.00 credit hours
    (Same as: ARTH 320 .) Selected study of Classical art from the Greek, Hellenistic or Roman period. Emphasis on the variety of ideologies and materials that characterize Classical art, how its development was influenced by earlier art traditions, and how the diverse strands of Classical art and culture are still recognizable in our contemporary world.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTH 100  or one Classical Studies course.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CLSS 380 - Ancient Mediterranean Religions

    4.00 credit hours
    Study of diversity within the religious traditions and practices of ancient Greco-Roman Mediterranean. Topics emphasized may include significance of religious rituals in public and private life (including sacrifices, festivals, prayers, magic, divination and initiation); funerary customs and beliefs associated with death; adoption and adaption of foreign cults in polytheistic societies; and interaction of Greek and Roman traditions with Abrahamic monotheisms.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    CLSS 385 - Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome

    4.00 credit hours
    Study of selected topics relating gender and sexuality within the civilizations of Greek and Roman antiquity (ca. 800 BCE–400 CE), including some attention to: beliefs and customs pertaining to gender developed and changed over time and in relation to changing social, cultural and political contexts; types of sources available for studying private lives of ancient Greek and Romans; and influence of studies on ancient gender on the development of Gender Studies as a discipline.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.
    iCon(s): Being Human.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
  
  

Communication

  
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    COMM 100 - Introduction to Public Speaking

    4.00 credit hours
    An introductory course examining fundamental public speaking skills, including the preparation, presentation and evaluation of informative and persuasive speeches. Particular focus on audience awareness and the organization of an oral message for comprehension. This course may not be taken after completing CARD 102 .


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    COMM 119 - Forensics Performance

    0.00-2.00 credit hours
    For debaters, oral interpreters and public speakers. Offered to all students who wish to participate in intercollegiate forensics. Instructor consent needed for 2.0 credit hours. This is a graded course regardless of credit.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    COMM 150 - Public Relations Practicum

    0.00-2.00 credit hours
    Students work with real-world clients to develop and apply public relations skills. Emphasis is placed on creating collateral (e.g., white papers and media kits), earned media and social media. Instructor approval required for 2 credit hours. This is a graded course, regardless of credit.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 250  or instructor consent.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    COMM 185 - Global Media in a Digital Age

    4.00 credit hours
    A survey of the development, structure, economics and regulation of the major media with a special emphasis on digital communication and the rise of the internet. Though the primary focus of the course is on media in U.S., some time and attention is devoted to global media industries. The sociological and cultural impact of media on society and civic life will be a central theme throughout the course.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Sciences, Global Understanding, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s): Engaging Civic Life, Innovating the World.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    COMM 200 - Interpersonal Communication

    4.00 credit hours
    An introductory study of the theory and practice of human communication within diverse relationships and contexts. The emphasis will be on dyadic (one-on-one) communication and the basic verbal and nonverbal strategies affecting perception and comprehension within the communication process. Key subtopics will include nonverbal communication, verbal styles, relationship development and conflict management. Requires participation in written and oral activities designed to develop and improve interpersonal skills.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Sciences.
    iCon(s): Being Human.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    COMM 214 - Group Interaction

    4.00 credit hours
    Students are introduced to the theory and practice of small group communication and decision-making. The course features an extensive group project, where students develop their abilities to participate, observe, analyze, evaluate and intervene in small group communication.

    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Sciences, Community Engaged Learning.
    iCon(s): Being Human.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    COMM 250 - Introduction to Public Relations

    4.00 credit hours
    An introductory course familiarizing students with core public relations concepts, historical underpinnings, foundational theory and careers in PR. An overview of the functions, practices and growing application of public relations in private industry and the public sector, the course examines the nature and role of public relations, activities of public relations professionals, the major influences impacting organizational behavior and the ethics of public relations.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    COMM 280 - Business and Professional Communication

    4.00 credit hours
    An intermediate course in which students develop the skills and strategies for use in written, face-to-face and electronic communication in professional settings. Students learn fundamentals of writing and presenting in professional contexts and may investigate organizational communication practices such as interviewing, performance feedback, training and meeting management.

    Prerequisite(s): CARD 102  or COMM 100 ; Junior standing.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    COMM 285 - Argumentation and Debate

    4.00 credit hours
    An intermediate course that addresses both theory and practice in argumentation. Through preparation and participation in debates, students learn the basic principles of debate, emphasizing the development of research, critical thinking and oral presentation skills.

    Prerequisite(s): CARD 102  or COMM 100 .
    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Humanities, Ethical Dimensions.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    COMM 287 - Advanced Public Speaking

    4.00 credit hours
    Building upon the fundamentals learned in COMM 100 , students refine their skills in impromptu, manuscript and extemporaneous speaking in applied settings. The class includes communication theory as well as speech preparation and delivery techniques for speeches that include variations of informative, persuasive and special occasion speeches, as well as emphasis on oral interpretation of texts. This advanced skills course serves Communication majors as well as other students who are seeking to improve their presentation skills.

    Prerequisite(s): CARD 102  or COMM 100 .
    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Arts.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    COMM 295 - Research Practicum

    0.00-4.00 credit hours
    Students work in collaboration with faculty on ongoing research. Activities vary according to project needs and student background, but may include recruitment of participants, data collection, data coding and entry, bibliography construction, literature review or statistical analysis. This course is graded pass/no pass. May be taken more than once for up to four total credit hours.


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    COMM 301 - Rhetoric and Public Discourse

    4.00 credit hours
    Students develop an understanding of rhetorical communication in the public sphere. The course explores historical and contemporary rhetorical theory, which students use to critique the rhetoric of current public issues. In addition to developing an understanding of the integral role rhetoric plays in civic life, students develop their abilities to analyze, critique and contribute to public discourse.

    Prerequisite(s): CARD 102  or COMM 100 .
    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Humanities.
    iCon(s): Engaging Civic Life.


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    COMM 317 - Intercultural Communication

    4.00 credit hours
    A study of the basic components involved in intercultural communication. Topics considered include, but are not limited to: cultural biases, cultural determinants of experiences and backgrounds, social perception, verbal interaction, nonverbal interaction and opinion leadership.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.
    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Social Sciences, Global Understanding.
    iCon(s): Challenging Inequity, Thinking Globally.


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    COMM 330 - Organizational Communication Theory

    4.00 credit hours
    Students develop an understanding of the major theoretical perspectives contributing to the study of organizational communication, from classical management through cultural, critical, feminist, postmodern and constitutive approaches. Students conduct basic field research and learn how to employ theoretical perspectives for analyzing communication practices in organizations.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 214  and four additional credit hours in Communication.
    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): U.S. Power Structures, Writing Intensive.


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    COMM 335 - Freedom of Expression

    4.00 credit hours
    Examines the First Amendment's protection of freedom of speech, religion, press and association, and its role as a cornerstone of American democracy. Students study foundational U.S. Supreme Court cases that have defined and delimited these freedoms. They learn how to analyze legal and moral arguments and conduct basic legal research. They also develop an understanding of the political and philosophical conflicts surrounding the exercise of First Amendment freedoms.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.
    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Ethical Dimensions.
    iCon(s): Engaging Civic Life.


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    COMM 350 - Public Relations Strategy

    4.00 credit hours
    An advanced-level course in PR examining organizational principles, applied theory and strategic planning practices—including social media integration-underscoring the effective management of public relations. Team-based applications of PR research planning, tactics and implementation for real-world clients. The course also emphasizes best practices in PR writing across platforms.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 250  and MEDI 225 .


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    COMM 355 - Public Relations Writing

    4.00 credit hours
    Students develop advanced writing skills applicable to the public relations industry. More specifically, the course focuses on professional writing across a variety of platforms including print, electronic media, social media, sales and promotion, campaigns and direct marketing.

    Prerequisite(s): MEDI 225 .


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    COMM 367 - Persuasion Theory

    4.00 credit hours
    An introduction to the study of persuasive communication from a social scientific perspective. Theories examines the characteristics of source, message and audience. Topics covered include strategic planning and organization of persuasive messages, audience analysis, motives and values, effective use of language, the role of context and purpose, propaganda and the abuse of persuasion, campaign planning and brand messaging. Students present and analyze persuasive materials orally and in writing as a way of developing communication and critical abilities.

    Prerequisite(s): CARD 101 ; CARD 102  or COMM 100 ; Junior standing.


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    COMM 370 - Health Communication

    4.00 credit hours
    Summative course examining the intertwining of communication with issues of health and medicine. Emphasis on the unique cultural, media, political-legal, interpersonal and organizational factors influencing communication in healthcare settings.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 200  or COMM 214 ; Junior standing.
    iCon(s): Examining Health.


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    COMM 389 - Gender, Sexuality and Mass Media

    4.00 credit hours
    (Same as: GSST 389 .) An advanced introduction to the complex relations between gender and the mass media. Special emphasis is placed on the social construction of gender and sexuality, representations of the body and feminist theories of media.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.
    Cardinal Directions Designation(s): Humanities, U.S. Power Structures.
    iCon(s): Being Human, Challenging Inequity.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
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    COMM 390 - Seminar in Communication

    4.00 credit hours
    Examination of special topics within the area of communication studies.

    Prerequisite(s): Eight credit hours in Communication.


    Click here for the schedule of classes.


  
  
 

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